Marlowe Evans
Marlowe Evans
Originally from Maple Ridge, British Columbia, Marlowe came to the University of New Brunswick to pursue a bachelor’s degree in political science. Marlowe is also the author of a column called “Being Young,” which is published bi-weekly in the Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows News.
January 24, 2019

Neville-Jones: The house of Lizards and Seagulls

Photo by Maria Nazareth Araújo.

Formerly Neville and Jones Houses, the two residences united under the name Neville-Jones in 2006. Jones House was named after a former UNB president and chancellor from the early 20th century; Neville’s namesake, Fred L. Neville, belonged to the final generation of Nevilles who farmed the land where the quad now stands. Neville-Jones went from being an all-male dorm to co-ed in 2011.

Neville’s house colours are green and yellow (not to be confused with the colours of her sister house, Neill, which are yellow and green) and residents are known as both Norsemen (the moniker from Neville House) and Lizards (Jones).

House charity events include the Neville-Jones Bed Push and the Blacklight Dance. The Blacklight Dance is exactly what it sounds like– an amazing night of dancing up at the Student Union Building, complete with blacklights. Everyone wears white to create a night like no other.

The Bed Push began in 1992 when two students pushed a residence bed from the UNB Fredericton campus to Saint John. The event was moved to the BMO field due to safety reasons, but the Norsemen still push the bed the equivalent distance, working in teams and taking shifts. Both events raise funds for the Women in Transition House.

Neville president Kevin McMakin and vice-president Fiona Baker said “Neville is special because it truly is a big family; you really feel like you belong.” They explained the house’s two unofficial mottos: “Chaust,” which means something along the lines of “keep it cool”; and “Keepin’ it classy,” which alludes to the fact that Neville residents are very devoted to respecting their house and each other.

The residence building has one very interesting quirk: the gulls. Every morning and every evening, a flock of seagulls can be seen roosting on top of Neville-Jones. Known affectionately as “The Neville Gulls,” these seagulls roam around campus during the day (occasionally rushing unwary students carrying food in the quad) and enjoy getting tipsy off of the crab apples that grow around UNB.

Neville-Jones is one of UNB’s smaller houses with a capacity of about 94 residents. This helps foster a more tight-knit, community atmosphere. It’s also located right next to the McConnell Dining Hall, which is very convenient during winter months when one is in need of a quick snack but doesn’t want to bear the cold.

Neville-Jones is the house for you if you’re looking for a fun residence right on the quad who identify Sheck Wes’ “Mo Bamba” as their unofficial anthem, and know how to have a great time.

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