Jack Sparks
Jack Sparks
April 9, 2019

Mice infestation squeaks into Neville-Jones residence

Alexandra Chedore found this dead mouse in her residence room. | Submitted photo

Alexandra Chedore’s residence room in Neville-Jones house became overrun with mice in late March.

The second-year chemical engineering student trapped two mice in her room, and also heard a one crawling through her heater.

“I didn’t bother trying to get it because I was so grossed out,” she said. “Then I found one in my hamper. Dead.”

Chedore and other residents of Neville-Jones have been grappling with a mice infestation that has forced some students to leave the building and stay with friends. The Residence Life office first received initial reports indicating the presence of mice on March 21.

Chedore said every room on the ground floor had mice in them, as well as roughly half the rooms in the entire residence.

Alexandra Chedore, a second-year chemical engineering student, trapped two mice in her room, heard a one crawling through her heater and found one dead in her laundry hamper. The Residence Life office first received initial reports indicating the presence of mice on March 21. | Photo: Alexandre Silberman

Angela Garnett, senior director of Residence Life, said in a statement that facilities staff inspected the building and set traps the same day initial reports were received.

“Pest control was also called and visited Neville-Jones the following morning, setting additional traps and monitoring the traps that had already been set,” Garnett wrote in an email.

Residence Life has also given students the option to relocate to a difference residence. No students have taken up the offer of relocation, according to Garnett.

Chedore said moving to a different residence can pose a challenge for students. She said her friend was offered to be moved to McLeod residence, but declined because McLeod is located the farthest from the centre of campus. Chedore herself has been staying in another residence with friends since the infestation broke out.

The costs for living in traditional UNB residences with the mandatory meal plan are higher than UNB tuition fees. The most inexpensive option, which includes living with a roommate, sits at just under $10,000 for the full academic year.

Neville Jones is a student residence on the University of New Brunswick campus. Students have reported the presence of mice in the building since late March. | Photo: Maria Nazareth Araujo

Mice are more likely to be a problem as spring begins and they exit their winter nests.

While mice are unpleasant pests to live with, their presence can also create health issues. Found in rodent urine and feces, hantavirus can be transmitted to humans if they come into contact with either of those substances. Mouse feces and urine can dry and turn into a dust which can also carry the virus. Hantavirus can cause severe health complications which can lead to death.

Brooke Benton, a first-year arts student, said she has seen a mouse running around her room twice in the past few weeks. She said they hide under her desk and bed.

“I know of about fifteen rooms that have had mice,” Benton said. “Our custodian Mike Hoyt has been doing the best he can for everyone dealing with the problem, and we are so grateful for his help.”

Garnett said Residence Life will conduct a thorough cleaning of each dorm room throughout the summer after students leave for the year.

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