Alexandre Silberman
Alexandre Silberman
Alexandre Silberman is a second year student at St. Thomas University, studying digital journalism and new media, political science and communications. Alexandre is originally from Burlington, Vermont, where he has worked for VTDigger.org, a statewide, non-profit news and politics website, and the Burlington Free Press, the region's largest daily newspaper. In April 2017, he was named a finalist for a Mark of Excellence Award from the Society of Professional Journalists, for a story on allegations of a harmful work environment for high school counselors. Outside of the newsroom, you can likely find Alexandre on the ski slopes or enjoying the outdoors.
October 16, 2018

Five things to know about cannabis on campus

A STU campus poster explains rules to follow after legalization. | Photo by Alexandre Silberman

New Brunswickers are now able to legally purchase and possess cannabis, and both university campuses in Fredericton have released guidelines for the substance.

St. Thomas University released a full policy to students on cannabis based on the provincial legislation, while the University of New Brunswick released a memo with guidelines.

Here’s what you need to know:

1. Students cannot smoke on university property

Smoking cannabis is not permitted on STU and UNB property, including residences and designated smoking areas on campus.

2. Edibles may be consumed in residence

On the UNB campus, non-smoked cannabis products may be consumed only by individuals 19 and over in “private residence rooms” and designated “residence common rooms or lounges.”

St. Thomas allows the consumption of edible cannabis in a private residence room or in a “designated residence lounge.

3. Plants cannot be grown

UNB’s message to students notes that the personal cultivation of cannabis plants “in residences or community gardens” is not permitted. STU also does not permit growing plants in residence or elsewhere on university property.

4. Medical use will be accommodated

UNB President Eddy Campbell wrote in an email to students that resources will be made available in the coming months to inform the community of medical use.

“UNB has, and will continue to have, a duty to accommodate the use of medical marijuana,” Campbell wrote. “ We will formalize processes regarding such accommodations in consultation with Human Resources and Student Services.”

“STU has a duty to accommodate the use of medical marijuana,” Kim Fenwick, the STU vice-president academic and research, wrote in an email. “Students seeking accommodation should visit Accessibility Services in George Martin Hall regarding appropriate procedures.”

5. Cannabis edibles cannot be cooked on campus

The preparation or cooking of edible cannabis products is not permitted on STU and UNB property.

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